Tuesday, 15 May 2012

Vintage crochet patterns

vintage crochet
The knot stitch - Clark's ONT Book of Crochet Patterns No.3 1917
vintage crochet
Luncheon set doilys from the Clark's ONT Book of Crochet Patterns No.3 1917
vintage crochet
The Grape and Leaf Centerpiece featured within Clark's ONT booklet of crochet patterns 1917.
vintage crochet
Front cover of the 1917 Filet Crochet with Instructions pattern booklet.
vintage crochet
Nightgown yoke detailing from the Royal Society Crochet Book No.8 1916
vintage crochet
Advertisement for crochet cottons featured in the Royal Society Crochet Booklet No.8 1916
vintage crochet
Butterfly used on yoke pattern taken from A.W.B Lingerie Special 1915
vintage crochet
Top - down; Yoke with butterflies, simple yoke with motifs applied to points. Taken from A.W.B Lingerie Special 1915.

In addition to learning how to crochet I really enjoy trying to create my own little collection of vintage patterns. Regardless of age, of style, their ware and tear or even what the patterns are for, merging together a collection is something I love doing. Its a collection that's been cheap to begin and started in the UK through hunting in charity shops or ones passed down to me. In honestly I had somewhat forget about this until finding some at the estate sale - I merely glanced at them, amazed they were vintage, grabbed and then paid for them. It wasn't until we were sitting in the car that their beauty emerged.

The first pattern booklet, the A.W.B Lingerie Special of Yokes, Trimmings and Crochet Hats which perfectly describes itself as providing "wonderful effects never before attempted in crochet" was copyright to 1915. I was more then amazed at something being 97 years old being in such good condition. And the more I looked, the wonder of this new collection grew. From this to the Royal Society Crochet Book No. 8 (1916), Filet Crochet with Instructions Series No.7 to Clark's ONT Book of Crochet Patterns No.3 (both 1917). Although the latter booklet is missing some of it's middle pages, these have become the oldest patterns in my collection. 

While they may have an age to them they have some gorgeous designs, from the intricate, delicate edging to your nightgown, the beautiful butterfly, to providing patterns for lampshades and edgings to table pieces - there really was something for the lady of that era. Whether you crochet or not I hope you can find and admire the beauty in the photographs and designs. I'm already eying up some of the doily patterns to tackle, I think it's about time I reunited myself with the art of doily crocheting.

26 comments:

  1. They look really complicated!
    Liz @ Shortbread & Ginger

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    1. Yes they do! They certainly knew how to make complicated crochet patterns in the past. I think the doilys should be ok [fingers crossed!] - I haven't really studied the patterns yet but I really want to give one a go.

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  2. They are exquisite! I've never mastered crochet or knitting and seem to have amasses a huge collection of vintage patterns, they are such pretty things to look at. x

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    1. Same here! Even if I never use them they just are so pretty. I'd love to frame some of the others I have - they deserve to be more readily seen.

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  3. they are all so lovely, i love the ones in the bottom photograph!

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    1. You got me thinking about seeing if I could do the bottom pattern and using it as a collar with a tee! The ideas, the ideas!

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  4. Ooh, lovely! I've made a couple of doilies recently and plan to display them as wall art. I've got a couple of old crochet books from charity shops, but nothing anywhere near as old as these!

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    1. The majority of my patterns I guess would be from the 1940s-1990s. But these are by far the earliest! Really need to get something to store them in.

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  5. There are really beautiful. My mom and I bought about 5 vintage like (1910's) booklets at a yard sale years ago. The designs are so beautiful but really time consuming since you use a tiny needle.

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    1. Yeah the little hooks make it really fiddly too - but I think you get a greater sense of achievement when you've completed one!

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  6. So many beautiful patterns !
    I can crochet a little
    But no where near as intricate as this !

    www.launainponderland.blogspot.com

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    1. I think they might be a little testing that is for sure. Saying that I do love a challenge!

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  7. the last ones are my favorite! what beautiful patterns!!!
    xo TJ

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  8. My gran was an expert at crotchet... sadly I never got her to teach me. I do own a load of doilies though :-)

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    1. Same with my gran she use to crochet a lot of edges on handkerchiefs. Sadly I wasn't interested in learning how to crochet till after she died.

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  9. oh my gosh. I wish I had the patience to read crochet or knitting patterns. Then I'd be able to make lacey collars!

    ♥ laura
    the blog of worldly delights
    the shop of worldly delights

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    1. I was thinking about attempting one of those collars!

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  10. These are all so beautiful! I love crochet.

    www.mayrabarragan90.blogspot.com

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    1. So fun to crochet isn't it?!

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    2. My grandmother knew how to crochet beautifully. I wish I had learned from her when I had the chance.

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  11. Oh the women on the cover of the pattern book is so beautiful. I love her wee cape.
    The butterfly is just gorgeous.
    Love v

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    1. She is worthy of being framed that is for sure!

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  12. Such gorgeous patterns, I love seeing stuff like this. I too would love to collect something similar xxx

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